Code of the District of Columbia

Subchapter II. The District of Columbia Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure.


§ 11–1521. Establishment of Commission.

There shall be a District of Columbia Commission on Judicial Disabilities and Tenure (hereafter in this subchapter referred to as the “Commission”). The Commission shall have power to suspend, retire, or remove a judge of a District of Columbia court, as provided in this subchapter.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 492, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1521.

1973 Ed., § 11-1521.

Cross References

Continuation of Commission, see § 1-207.18.

District Charter provisions relating to establishment of Commission, and its power to remove, suspend, or retire judges, see §§ 1-204.31 and 1-204.32.


§ 11–1522. Membership.

(a) The Commission shall consist of five members appointed as follows:

(1) The President of the United States shall appoint three members of the Commission. Of the members appointed by the President —

(A) at least one member must be a member of the District of Columbia bar who has been actively engaged in the practice of law in the District of Columbia for at least five of the ten years immediately before appointment; and

(B) at least two members must be residents of the District of Columbia.

(2) The Commissioner [Mayor] of the District of Columbia shall appoint one member of the Commission. The member appointed by the Commissioner [Mayor] must be a resident of the District of Columbia and not an attorney.

(3) The chief judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia shall appoint one member of the Commission. The member appointed by the chief judge shall be an active or retired Federal judge serving in the District of Columbia.

The President shall designate as Chair of the Commission one of the members appointed pursuant to paragraph (1) who is a member of the District of Columbia bar who has been actively engaged in the practice of law in the District of Columbia for at least five of the ten years before the member’s appointment.

(b) There shall be three alternate members of the Commission, who shall serve as members pursuant to rules adopted by the Commission. The alternate members shall be appointed as follows:

(1) The President shall appoint one alternate member, who shall be a resident of the District of Columbia and a member of the bar of the District of Columbia who has been actively engaged in the practice of law in the District of Columbia for at least five of the ten years immediately before appointment.

(2) The Commissioner [Mayor] shall appoint one alternate member who shall be a resident of the District of Columbia and not an attorney.

(3) The chief judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia shall appoint one alternate member who shall be an active or retired Federal judge serving in the District of Columbia.

(c) No member or alternate member of the Commission shall be a member, officer, or employee of the legislative branch or of an executive or military department of the United States Government (listed in section 101 or 102 of title 5, United States Code); and no member or alternate member (other than a member or alternate member appointed by the chief judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia) shall be an officer or employee of the judicial branch of the United States Government. No member or alternate member of the Commission shall be an officer or employee of the District of Columbia government (including its judicial branch).


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 492, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, §§ 1(b)(25)-(27), 108 Stat. 713.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1522.

1973 Ed., § 11-1522.

Cross References

District Charter provisions relating to Commission membership, see § 1-204.31.

Change in Government

This section originated at a time when local government powers were delegated at the District of Columbia Council and to a Commissioner of the District of Columbia. The District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act, 87 Stat. 818, § 711 ( D.C. Code, § 1-207.11), abolished the District of Columbia Council and the Office of Commissioner of the District of Columbia. These branches of government were replaced by the Council of the District of Columbia and the Office of Mayor of the District of Columbia, respectively. Accordingly, and also pursuant to § 714(a) of such Act ( D.C. Code, § 1-207.14(a)), appropriate changes in terminology were made, in brackets, in this section.


§ 11–1523. Terms of office; vacancy; continuation of service by a member.

(a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), the term of office of members and alternate members of the Commission shall be six years.

(2) Of the members and alternate members first appointed to the Commission —

(A) one member and alternate member appointed by the President shall be appointed for a term of six years, one member appointed by the President shall be appointed for a term of four years, and one such member shall be appointed for a term of two years, as designated by the President at the time of appointment;

(B) the member and alternate member appointed by the chief judge of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia shall be appointed for a term of four years; and

(C) the member and alternate member appointed by the Commissioner [Mayor] of the District of Columbia shall be appointed for a term of two years.

(b) A member or alternate member appointed to fill a vacancy occurring before the expiration of the term of that member’s predecessor shall serve only for the remainder of that term. Any vacancy on the Commission shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment was made.

(c) If approved by the Commission, a member may serve after the expiration of that member’s term for purposes of participating until conclusion in a matter, relating to the suspension, retirement, or removal of a judge, begun before the expiration of that member’s term. A member’s successor may be appointed without regard to the member’s continuation in service, but that member’s successor may not participate in the matter for which the member’s continuation in service was approved.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 493, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, §§ 1(b)(28), (29), 108 Stat. 713.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1523.

1973 Ed., § 11-1523.

Cross References

District Charter provisions relating to terms of office and vacancies on Commission, see § 1-204.31.

Change in Government

This section originated at a time when local government powers were delegated to the District of Columbia Council and to a Commissioner of the District of Columbia. The District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act, 87 Stat. 818, § 711 ( D.C. Code, § 1-207.11), abolished the District of Columbia Council and the Office of Commissioner of the District of Columbia. These branches of government were replaced by the Council of the District of Columbia and the Office of Mayor of the District of Columbia, respectively. Accordingly, and also pursuant to § 714(a) of such Act ( D.C. Code, § 1-207.14(a)), appropriate changes in terminology were made, in brackets, in this section.


§ 11–1524. Compensation.

Members of the Tenure Commission shall serve without compensation for services rendered in connection with their official duties on the Commission.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 493, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; Apr. 26, 1996, 110 Stat. 210, Pub. L. 104-134, § 133(a).)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1524.

1973 Ed., § 11-1524.

Cross References

District Charter provisions relating to compensation, see § 1-204.31.


§ 11–1525. Operations; personnel; administrative services.

(a) The Commission may make such rules and regulations for its operations as it may deem necessary, and such rules and regulations shall be effective on the date specified by the Commission. The District of Columbia Administrative Procedure Act (D.C. Official Code, secs. 2-501 to 2-510) shall be applicable to the Commission only as provided by this subsection. For the purposes of the publication of rules and regulations, judicial notice, and the filing and compilation of rules, sections 5, 7, and 8 of that Act (D.C. Official Code, secs. 2-504, 2-505, and 2-507), insofar as consistent with this subchapter, shall be applicable to the Commission; and for purposes of those sections, the Commission shall be deemed an independent agency as defined in section 3(5) of that Act (D.C. Official Code, sec. 2-502). Nothing contained herein shall be construed to require prior public notice and hearings on the subject of rules adopted by the Commission.

(b) The Commission is authorized, without regard to the provisions governing appointment and classification of District of Columbia employees, to appoint and fix the compensation of, or to contract for, such officers, assistants, reporters, counsel, and other persons as may be necessary for the performance of its duties. It is authorized to obtain the services of medical and other experts in accordance with the provisions of section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, but at rates not to exceed the daily equivalent of the rate provided for GS-18 of the General Schedule.

(c) The District of Columbia is authorized to detail, on a reimbursable basis, any of its personnel to assist in carrying out the duties of the Commission.

(d) Financial and administrative services (including those related to budgeting and accounting, financial reporting, personnel, and procurement) shall be provided to the Commission by the District of Columbia, for which payment shall be made in advance, or by reimbursement, from funds of the Commission in such amounts as may be agreed upon by the Chair of the Commission and the District of Columbia government. Regulations of the District of Columbia for the administrative control of funds shall apply to funds appropriated to the Commission.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 493, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, § 1(b)(30), 108 Stat. 713.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1525.

1973 Ed., § 11-1525.

Cross References

District Charter provisions relating to rules and regulations of Commission, see § 1-204.31.

References in Text

The General Schedule, referred to at the end of the last sentence of subsection (b) of this section, appears in 5 U.S.C. § 5332.


§ 11–1526. Removal; involuntary retirement; proceedings.

(a)(1) A judge of a District of Columbia court shall be removed from office upon the filing in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals by the Commission of an order of removal certifying the entry, in any court within the United States, of a final judgment of conviction of a crime which is punishable as a felony under Federal law or which would be a felony in the District of Columbia.

(2) A judge of a District of Columbia court shall also be removed from office upon affirmance of an appeal from an order of removal filed in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals by the Commission (or upon expiration of the time within which such an appeal may be taken) after a determination by the Commission of —

(A) willful misconduct in office,

(B) willful and persistent failure to perform judicial duties, or

(C) any other conduct which is prejudicial to the administration of justice or which brings the judicial office into disrepute.

(b) A judge of a District of Columbia court shall be involuntarily retired from office when (1) the Commission determines that the judge suffers from a mental or physical disability (including habitual intemperance) which is or is likely to become permanent and which prevents, or seriously interferes with, the proper performance of the judge’s judicial duties, and (2) the Commission files in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals an order of involuntary retirement and the order is affirmed on appeal or the time within which an appeal may be taken from the order has expired.

(c)(1) A judge of a District of Columbia court shall be suspended, without salary —

(A) upon —

(i) proof of conviction of a crime referred to in subsection (a)(1) which has not become final, or

(ii) the filing of an order of removal under subsection (a)(2) which has not become final; and

(B) upon the filing by the Commission of an order of suspension in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals.

Suspension under this paragraph shall continue until termination of all appeals. If the conviction is reversed or the order of removal is set aside, the judge shall be reinstated and shall recover salary and all rights and privileges pertaining to the judge’s office.

(2) A judge of a District of Columbia court shall be suspended from all judicial duties, with such retirement salary as the judge may be entitled to pursuant to subchapter III of this chapter, upon the filing by the Commission of an order of involuntary retirement under subsection (b) in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. Suspension shall continue until termination of all appeals. If the order of involuntary retirement is set aside, the judge shall be reinstated and shall recover the judge’s judicial salary less any retirement salary received and shall be entitled to all the rights and privileges of office.

(3) A judge of a District of Columbia court shall be suspended from all or part of judicial duties, with salary, if the Commission, upon the concurrence of three members, (A) orders a hearing for the removal or retirement of the judge pursuant to this subchapter and determines that suspension is in the interest of the administration of justice, and (B) files an order of suspension in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals. The suspension shall terminate as specified in the order (which may be modified, as appropriate, by the Commission) but in no event later than the termination of all appeals.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 494, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, §§ 1(b)(31)-(35), 108 Stat. 713.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1526.

1973 Ed., § 11-1526.

Section References

This section is referenced in § 11-1527, § 11-1529, § 11-1530, § 11-1562, and § 11-1564.

Cross References

District Charter provisions relating to removal, suspension, and involuntary retirement of judges, see § 1-204.32.


§ 11–1527. Procedures.

(a)(1) On its own initiative, or upon complaint or report of any person, formal or informal, the Commission may undertake an investigation of the conduct or health of any judge. After such investigation as it deems adequate, the Commission may terminate the investigation or it may order a hearing concerning the health or conduct of the judge. No order affecting the tenure of a judge based on grounds for removal set forth in section 11-1526(a)(2) or 11-1530(b)(3) shall be made except after a hearing as provided by this subchapter. Nothing in this subchapter shall preclude any informal contacts with the judge, or the chief judge of the court in which the judge serves, by the Commission, whether before or after a hearing is ordered, to discuss any matter related to its investigation.

(2) A judge whose conduct or health is to be the subject of a hearing by the Commission shall be given notice of such hearing and of the nature of the matters under inquiry not less than thirty days before the date on which the hearing is to be held. The judge shall be admitted to such hearing and to every subsequent hearing regarding the judge’s conduct or health. The judge may be represented by counsel, offer evidence in his or her own behalf, and confront and cross-examine witnesses against the judge.

(3) Within ninety days after the adjournment of hearings, the Commission shall make findings of fact and a determination regarding the conduct or health of a judge who was the subject of the hearing. The concurrence of at least four members shall be required for a determination of grounds for removal or retirement. Upon a determination of grounds for removal or retirement, the Commission shall file an appropriate order pursuant to subsection (a) or (b) of section 11-1526. On or before the date the order is filed, the Commission shall notify the judge, the chief judge of the court in which the judge serves, and the President of the United States.

(b) The Commission shall keep a record of any hearing on the conduct or health of a judge and one copy of such record shall be provided to the judge at the expense of the Commission.

(c)(1) In the conduct of investigations and hearings under this section the Commission may administer oaths, order and otherwise provide for the inspection of books and records, and issue subpenas [subpoenas] for attendance of witnesses and the production of papers, books, accounts, documents, and testimony relevant to any such investigation or hearing. It may order a judge whose health is in issue to submit to a medical examination by a duly licensed physician designated by the Commission.

(2) Whenever a witness before the Commission refuses, on the basis of the witness’s privilege against self-incrimination, to testify or produce books, papers, documents, records, recordings, or other materials, and the Commission determines that the testimony or production of evidence is necessary to the conduct of its proceedings, it may order the witness to testify or produce the evidence. The Commission may issue the order no earlier than ten days after the day on which it served the Attorney General with notice of its intention to issue the order. The witness may not refuse to comply with the order on the basis of the witness’s privilege against self-incrimination, but no testimony or other information compelled under the order (or any information directly or indirectly derived from the testimony or production of evidence) may be used against the witness in any criminal case, nor may it be used as a basis for subjecting the witness to any penalty or forfeiture contrary to constitutional right or privilege. No witness shall be exempt under this subsection from prosecution for perjury committed while giving testimony or producing evidence under compulsion as provided in this subsection.

(3) If any person refuses to attend, testify, or produce any writing or things required by a subpena [subpoena] issued by the Commission, the Commission may petition the United States district court for the district in which the person may be found for an order compelling that person to attend and testify or produce the writings or things required by subpena [subpoena]. The court shall order the person to appear before it at a specified time and place and then and there shall consider why that person has not attended, testified, or produced writings or things as required. A copy of the order shall be served upon that person. If it appears to the court that the subpena [subpoena] was regularly issued, the court shall order the person to appear before the Commission at the time or place fixed in the order and to testify or produce the required writings or things. Failure to obey the order shall be punishable as contempt of court.

(4) In pending investigations or proceedings before it, the Commission may order the deposition of any person to be taken in such form and subject to such limitation as may be prescribed in the order. The Commission may file in the Superior Court a petition, stating generally, without identifying the judge, the nature of the pending matter, the name and residence of the person whose testimony is desired, and directions, if any, of the Commission requesting an order requiring the person to appear and testify before a designated officer. Upon the filing of the petition the Superior Court may order the person to appear and testify. A subpena [subpoena] for such deposition shall be issued by the clerk of the Superior Court and the deposition shall be taken and returned in the manner prescribed by law for civil actions.

(d) It shall be the duty of the United States marshals upon the request of the Commission to serve process and to execute all lawful orders of the Commission.

(e) Each witness, other than an officer or employee of the United States or the District of Columbia, shall receive for attendance the same fees, and all witnesses shall receive the allowances, prescribed by section 15-714 for witnesses in civil cases. The amount shall be paid by the Commission from funds appropriated to it.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 495, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, §§ 1(b)(36)-(41), 108 Stat. 713.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1527.

1973 Ed., § 11-1527.

Editor's Notes

Throughout subsection (c), “subpoena” and “subpoenas” were inserted, in brackets, to correct misspellings.


§ 11–1528. Privilege; confidentiality.

(a)(1) Subject to paragraph (2), the filing of papers with, and the giving of testimony before, the Commission shall be privileged. Subject to paragraph (2), hearings before the Commission, the record thereof, and materials and papers filed in connection with such hearings shall be confidential.

(2)(A) The judge whose conduct or health is the subject of any proceedings under this chapter may disclose or authorize the disclosure of any information under paragraph (1).

(B) With respect to a prosecution of a witness for perjury or on review of a decision of the Commission, the record of hearings before the Commission and all papers filed in connection with such hearing shall be disclosed to the extent required for such prosecution or review.

(C) Upon request, the Commission shall disclose, on a privileged and confidential basis, to the District of Columbia Judicial Nomination Commission any information under paragraph (1) concerning any judge being considered by such nomination commission for elevation to the District of Columbia Court of Appeals or for chief judge of a District of Columbia court.

(b) If the Commission determines that no grounds for removal or involuntary retirement exist it shall notify the judge and inquire whether the judge desires the Commission to make available to the public information pertaining to the nature of its investigation, its hearings, findings, determinations, or any other fact related to its proceedings regarding the judge’s health or conduct. Upon receipt of such request in writing from the judge, the Commission shall make such information available to the public.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 497, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; Oct. 28, 1986, 100 Stat. 3228, Pub. L. 99-573, § 11; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, § 1(b)(42), 108 Stat. 713.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1528.

1973 Ed., § 11-1528.


§ 11–1529. Judicial review.

(a) A judge aggrieved by an order of removal or retirement filed by the Commission pursuant to subsection (a) or (b) of section 11-1526 may seek judicial review thereof by filing notice of appeal with the Chief Justice of the United States. Notice of appeal shall be filed within 30 days of the filing of the order of the Commission in the District of Columbia Court of Appeals.

(b) Upon receipt of notice of appeal from an order of the Commission, the Chief Justice shall convene a special court consisting of three Federal judges designated from among active or retired judges of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.

(c) The special court shall review the order of the Commission appealed from and, to the extent necessary to decision and when presented, shall decide all relevant questions of law and interpret constitutional and statutory provisions. Within 90 days after oral argument or submission on the briefs if oral argument is waived, the special court shall affirm or reverse the order of the Commission or remand the matter to the Commission for further proceedings.

(d) The special court shall hold unlawful and set aside a Commission order or determination found to be —

(1) arbitrary, capricious, and abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with law;

(2) contrary to constitutional right, power, privilege, or immunity;

(3) in excess of statutory jurisdiction, authority, or limitations, or short of statutory right;

(4) without observance of procedure required by law; or

(5) unsupported by substantial evidence.

In making the foregoing determinations, the special court shall review the whole record or those parts of it cited by the judge or the Commission, and shall take due account of the rule of prejudicial error.

(e) As appropriate and to the extent consistent with this chapter, the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure governing appeals in civil cases shall apply to appeals taken under this section.

(f) Decisions of the special court shall be final and conclusive.


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 497, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111.)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1529.

1973 Ed., § 11-1529.

Section References

This section is referenced in § 11-1530.


§ 11–1530. Financial statements.

(a) Pursuant to such rules as the Commission shall promulgate, each judge of the District of Columbia courts shall, within 1 year following the date of enactment of the District of Columbia Court Reorganization Act of 1970[July 29, 1970] and at least annually thereafter, file with the Commission a report containing the following information:

(1)(A) The source, type and amount of the judge's income which exceeds $200 (other than income from the United States government and income referred to in subparagraph (C)) for the period covered by the report.

(B) The source and type of the judge's spouse's income which exceeds $1,000 (other than income from the United States government and income referred to in subparagraph (C)) for the period covered by the report.

(C) The source and type of income which consists of dividends, rents, interest, and capital gains received by the judge and the judge's spouse during such period which exceeds $200 in amount or value, and an indication of which of the following categories the amount or value of such item of income is within--

(i) not more than $1,000;

(ii) greater than 1,000 but not more than $2,500;

(iii) greater than $2,500 but not more than $5,000;

(iv) greater than $5,000 but not more than $15,000;

(v) greater than $15,000 but not more than $50,000;

(vi) greater than $50,000 but not more than $100,000;

(vii) greater than $100,000 but not more than $1,000,000;

(viii) greater than $1,000,000 but not more than $5,000,000; or

(ix) greater than $5,000,000.

(2) The name and address of each private foundation or eleemosynary institution, and of each business or professional corporation, firm, or enterprise in which the judge was an officer, director, proprietor, or partner during such period.

(3) The identity and category of value (as set forth in subsection (b)) of each liability of $10,000 or more owed by the judge or by the judge and the judge's spouse jointly at any time during such period.

(4) The source and value of all gifts in the aggregate amount or value of $250 or more from any single source received by the judge during such period, except gifts from the judge's spouse or any of the judge's children or parents.

(5) The identity of each trust in which the judge held a beneficial interest having a value of $10,000 or more at any time during such period, and in the case of any trust in which the judge held any beneficial interest during such period, the identity, if known, of each interest in real or personal property in which the trust held a beneficial interest having a value of $10,000 or more at any time during such period. If the judge cannot obtain the identity of the trust interest, the judge shall request the trustee to report that information to the Commission.

(6) The identity and category of value (as set forth in subsection (b)) of each interest in real or personal property having a value of $10,000 or more which the judge owned at any time during such period.

(7) The amount or value and source of each honorarium of $250 or more received by the judge and the judge's spouse during such period.

(8) The source and amount of all money, other than that received from the United States government, received in the form of an expense account or as reimbursement for expenditures from any source aggregating more than $250 during such period.

(9) The source and amount of all waivers or partial waivers of fees or charges accepted by the judge on behalf of the judge or the judge's spouse, domestic partner, or guest during such period.

(b) For purposes of paragraphs (3) and (6) of subsection (a), the categories of value set forth in this subsection are--

(1) not more than $15,000;

(2) greater than $15,000 but not more than $50,000;

(3) greater than $50,000 but not more than $100,000;

(4) greater than $100,000 but not more than $250,000;

(5) greater than $250,000 but not more than $500,000;

(6) greater than $500,000 but not more than $1,000,000;

(7) greater than $1,000,000 but not more than $5,000,000;

(8) greater than $5,000,000 but not more than $25,000,000;

(9) greater than $25,000,000 but not more than $50,000,000; and

(10) greater than $50,000,000.

(c)(1) Reports filed pursuant to this section shall, upon written request, and notice to the reporting judge for purposes of making an application to the Commission for a redaction pursuant to paragraph(2), be made available for public inspection and copying within a reasonable time after filing and during the period they are kept by the Commission (in accordance with rules promulgated by the Commission), and shall be kept by the Commission for not less than 3 years.

(2) This section does not require the public availability of reports filed by a judge if upon application by the reporting judge, a finding is made by the Commission that revealing personal and sensitive information could endanger that judge or a family member of that judge, except that a report may be redacted pursuant to this paragraph only--

(A) to the extent necessary to protect the individual who filed the report or a family member of that individual; and

(B) for as long as the danger to such individual exists.

(d) The intentional failure by a judge of a District of Columbia court to file a report required by this section, or the filing of a fraudulent report, shall constitute willful misconduct in office and shall be grounds for removal from office under section 11-1526(a)(2).


(July 29, 1970, 84 Stat. 498, Pub. L. 91-358, title I, § 111; June 13, 1994, Pub. L. 103-266, §§ 1(b)(43)-(50), 108 Stat. 713; Dec. 14, 2016, 130 Stat. 1350, Pub. L. 114-257, § 2(a).)

Prior Codifications

1981 Ed., § 11-1530.

1973 Ed., § 11-1530.

Section References

This section is referenced in § 11-1527.

Cross References

D.C. judges retirement fund, see § 1-714.

D.C. retirement funds, transition from District of Columbia Administration, see § 1-819.01.

District employees retirement program management, “retirement program” defined, see § 1-702.

District of Columbia courts, Executive Officer, eligibility for retirement, see § 11-1703.

Judges, tenure, see § 11-1502.

References in Text

The date of enactment of the District of Columbia Court Reorganization Act of 1970, referred to in the introductory language of subsection (a) of this section, is July 29, 1970.

Editor's Notes

Section 2(b) of Public Law 114-257 provided that the amendments made by subsection (a) of Public Law 114-257 shall apply with respect to reports filed under section 11-1530, D.C. Official Code, that cover periods beginning during or after 2016.